Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge| Master Guide | 2023.

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Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge is a program designed to help individuals struggling with a disability relieve their student loan debt. 

Disabilities may not always be apparent, and thus it is crucial to understand the TPD program and how to become eligible for it. 

This guide will provide a comprehensive overview of Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge, its eligibility criteria, and the process involved.

Why Should You Apply?

It is essential to apply for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge if your disability could warrant this type of forgiveness. A successful application can lead to the forgiveness of substantial loan amounts, providing significant relief for individuals struggling with disabilities. 

Ways to Become Eligible

There are three primary ways to qualify for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge:

Veterans Affairs Determination

If the Veterans Affairs Administration determines that you are 100% disabled, you could be eligible for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge. The Veterans Affairs and the Social Security Administration consistently send updates to the TPD program, determining who could be eligible.

Social Security Administration Determination

The Social Security Administration can also determine your eligibility. It’s crucial to have your award letter handy, especially during the review period, which occurs every five to seven years. 

Physician Certification

For those who aren’t veterans and aren’t receiving social security, physician certification is the route to take. You’ll need a physician to complete sections one through three of the Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge application. 

The Department of Education may require you to see a physician from their roster to determine if you have a significant physical or mental disability that prevents you from working.

Disability Categories and Examples that Qualify for student loan forgiveness

The U.S. Department of Education has set criteria for a “total and permanent disability” for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge. 

Here are some of the general disability categories that might qualify:

1. Physical Disabilities: These include but are not limited to conditions like:

  • Paralysis
  • Chronic pain conditions (such as fibromyalgia)
  • Serious diseases (like cancer, chronic heart disease)
  • Chronic pulmonary/respiratory disorders (like COPD, cystic fibrosis)
  • Severe neurological disorders (like multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy)
  • Blindness
  • Deafness
  • Amputations

2. Mental Health Disabilities: These include but are not limited to conditions such as:

  • Schizophrenia
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Severe anxiety disorder

3. Intellectual Disabilities: These include conditions such as Down syndrome or other cognitive impairments severely limiting one or more major life activities.

These are general categories and examples, and not an exhaustive list. 

The specific evaluation of a disability and whether it qualifies for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge is typically conducted by a physician, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, or the Social Security Administration. 

It’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional or the relevant department to understand if a particular condition qualifies.

Documentation Requirements

To be considered for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge, you need to prove that you have a physical or mental impairment that:

  • Could result in death
  • Has lasted for a continuous period of no less than 60 months
  • Can be expected to last for over 60 months or more

Thus, having a track history documentation of five years or more is important.

Application Process

The application process for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge, while not difficult, can be tedious. If you’re going through the physician certification process, you must ensure that your paperwork is signed and returned within 90 days from the physician back to the department. 

If you have the veteran certification or the social security administration to sign off, the process should be smoother.

You must provide evidence of your disability, fill out an application, and possibly undergo a review process. 

Here are the detailed steps:

1. Obtain a TPD Discharge Application: You can download the application from the official TPD Discharge website.

2. Complete the Application: The application will require personal information, details about your loans, and specifics about your disability. It’s crucial to fill out this application accurately and completely. 

3. Provide Evidence of Your Disability: Depending on your situation, you will need to provide one of the following:

  • If you are a veteran, you can submit documentation from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) showing that the VA has determined that you are unemployable due to a service-connected disability.
  • Suppose you receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). In that case, you can submit a Social Security Administration (SSA) notice of award for SSDI or SSI benefits stating that your next scheduled disability review will be within five to seven years from the date of your most recent SSA disability determination.
  • If neither of the above applies, you can submit certification from a physician that you are totally and permanently disabled. Your physician must certify that you are unable to engage in any substantial gainful activity due to a physical or mental impairment that can be expected to result in death, has lasted for a continuous period of not less than 60 months, or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 60 months.

4. Submit Your Application: You can submit the completed application and any accompanying documentation through the mail or online at the TPD Discharge website.

5. Loan Servicer Review: After you submit your application, the Department of Education will contact your loan holders and instruct them to suspend collection activity on your loans for a period of 120 days. This will give you time to complete and submit the discharge application.

6. Application Review: The Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge Servicer will review your application. If the application is approved, the Department of Education will contact your loan holders and instruct them to discharge your loans. If the application is not approved, the Department will inform you of the denial and your loans will return to the status they were in before the application was received.

7. Post-Discharge Monitoring Period: If your application is approved, you will be subject to a 3-year post-discharge monitoring period starting from the date the discharge was approved. During this period, you must meet certain requirements, such as not taking out any new student loans, and if you fail to meet these requirements, your loans might be reinstated.

Remember, it’s important to stay in touch with your loan servicer during this process, and be proactive in providing any additional information that may be required. 

Be sure to ask any questions you have and make sure you understand all the implications of TPD Discharge.

Recap

TPD Discharge is a significant program for those struggling with disabilities. It’s essential to understand the eligibility requirements and the application process to make the most of this program. 

If you’re struggling with a disability and have student loan debt, it’s worth considering applying for Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge.

Moving Forward: The Importance of Professional Advice

Student loans can be a daunting burden, especially for individuals dealing with disabilities. The Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge program provides a path to financial freedom, but navigating the requirements, the application process, and the follow-up can be complex and overwhelming. 

That’s why getting professional help can be invaluable. A student loan advisor can guide you through the process, help you understand the requirements and criteria, and advocate for you every step of the way. They can provide personalized advice tailored to your unique circumstances and help you make the best decisions for your financial future. 

Don’t let the complexity of the process discourage you from seeking the relief you deserve. Contact a student loan advisor today and take the first step towards a brighter, debt-free future.

FAQS

What is a TPD Discharge?

A Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge is a type of student loan forgiveness available to individuals who are totally and permanently disabled. If approved, you are no longer required to repay certain types of student loans.

Who qualifies for a TPD Discharge?

Individuals who can provide documentation from the VA that they are unemployable due to a service-connected disability, are receiving SSDI or SSI benefits with a next scheduled review in five to seven years, or have certification from a physician that they are totally and permanently disabled can qualify for a Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge.

What loans are eligible for TPD Discharge?

The following loans are eligible for TPD Discharge: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program loans, Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program loans, and Federal Perkins Loans. In addition, Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant service obligations can be discharged.

What happens during the post-discharge monitoring period?

After your loans are discharged, you will be subject to a 3-year post-discharge monitoring period. During this time, you must meet certain requirements such as not taking out any new student loans. Failure to meet these requirements may result in your loans being reinstated.

Can I apply for a TPD Discharge on my own?

Yes, you can apply for a TPD Discharge on your own. However, due to the complexity of the process and the importance of the outcome, many people choose to seek assistance from a student loan advisor or another knowledgeable professional.

Can you work after TPD discharge?

After the three-year monitoring period ends, there are no restrictions or requirements related to working.

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Join the over 50 Thousand people who have received help from Debtmanagementsuccess.com!

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